Sunday, 23 October 2016

'The Noises': Film Review | Busan 2016

In this article we write a complete information hollywood 'The Noises': Film Review | Busan 2016. In this article we write a list of horer movies missons movies civil war movies based on jungle movies batman movies superman movies Warcraft  movies based on animal movies based on biography drama comedy adventure based on full action movie based on full romance movies based on adventure action and other type of movies details are provide in this article. A good collection of all fantastic movies 2016 are here

watch movies free online


Latest Hollywood 'The Noises': Film Review | Busan 2016 And News:

Min Je-hong makes his debut in BIFF’s Vision section with an oddball meditation on loneliness.
A lonely young man’s quest to kill himself is sidetracked by one unlikely misadventure after another in The Noises, an aggressively arty but ultimately engaging chamber piece that shirks answering the obvious questions in favor of watching its subject come back from the brink. Multi-tasking firsttime director Min Je-hong — who also wrote, shot and edited the pic — is blessed with an appealing lead in unknown actor Kim Joon-ho for his spare, ambiguous story, which saves it from teetering into abject pretension. Nonetheless, The Noises is indeed the kind of movie festivals were made for (and films like this are made for festivals) and its modest charms are sure to find a place on the circuit. The film is nigh well unsellable anywhere else.

We begin with handsome twentysomething Junho (Kim) in his bedroom, double-checking on a noose dangling from his ceiling for his imminent suicide. Shot in soft black-and-white, there are no hard edges or sharp contrast to lend the scene an ominous tone; it’s all very prosaic. All seems to be going well until Junho is interrupted by a phone call from his mother in California, which he answers before brushing her off with an “I'm in the middle of something.” Then it’s the wobbly table that won’t support his weight. Then it’s the doorbell. Upon answering he finds Scarlett (Kim Min-ji), a prostitute she claims Junho called the night before. Though he doesn’t recall, he takes her word for it and invites her in. Eventually they strike a bargain: no sex, but Scarlett will hang out with Junho for three days for a cool two million won (about $1,700). He gets the companionship he so desperately craves, she gets rich.

From there things take a turn for the increasingly absurd, as Junho and Scarlett chatter away without ever revealing too much about themselves (the noose always hanging between them), and more freak events put Junho’s suicide on the back burner. The highlight (or low point for Junho) comes when EMS workers looking for a pregnant woman barge into the house while he’s on the phone with his frantic mother (his dad is missing) — and then commandeer his rope. Scarlett, however, has ulterior motives, which play out when her “pimp” shows up demanding more cash.

The Noises is vaguely reminiscent of Lee Seung-won’s New Currents Netpac-winner Communication & Lies from 2015: a low-budget indie, shot in black-and-white and pivoting on two lonely people trying to make a connection (one more pic like it and it’s officially a trend). Essentially a two-hander unfolding in one location, The Noises, however, has a dark comic streak running through it, and is less interested in explaining the root causes of Junho’s desire to end his life. It’s enough for Min to watch Junho react to his environment and puzzle out what makes him take the noose down for good.

By its very nature, the film relies on the back and forth between the two leads, and they do have their moments, chiefly an impromptu dance that unfortunately brings their budding friendship to a screeching halt. They’re a bit creaky at the outset but soon rise above awkward community theater-type acting to settle into a comfortable rhythm. Kim Min-ji keeps pace with her co-star regardless of the fact she has less to work with: Scarlett’s motivations are even less defined than Junho’s, and Min puts her this close to “hooker with a heart of gold” territory. Technically, The Noises is acceptable, even if it’s stylistically unremarkable.

Venue: Busan International Film Festival
Cast: Kim Joon-ho, Kim Min-ji
Director-screenwriter: Min Je-hong
Producer: Ji Jae-hwan
Director of photography: Min Je-hong
Production designer: Lee Mi-so
Editor: Min Je-hong
Music: Narae

In Korean


Not rated, 77 minutesMin Je-hong makes his debut in BIFF’s Vision section with an oddball meditation on loneliness.
A lonely young man’s quest to kill himself is sidetracked by one unlikely misadventure after another in The Noises, an aggressively arty but ultimately engaging chamber piece that shirks answering the obvious questions in favor of watching its subject come back from the brink. Multi-tasking firsttime director Min Je-hong — who also wrote, shot and edited the pic — is blessed with an appealing lead in unknown actor Kim Joon-ho for his spare, ambiguous story, which saves it from teetering into abject pretension. Nonetheless, The Noises is indeed the kind of movie festivals were made for (and films like this are made for festivals) and its modest charms are sure to find a place on the circuit. The film is nigh well unsellable anywhere else.

We begin with handsome twentysomething Junho (Kim) in his bedroom, double-checking on a noose dangling from his ceiling for his imminent suicide. Shot in soft black-and-white, there are no hard edges or sharp contrast to lend the scene an ominous tone; it’s all very prosaic. All seems to be going well until Junho is interrupted by a phone call from his mother in California, which he answers before brushing her off with an “I'm in the middle of something.” Then it’s the wobbly table that won’t support his weight. Then it’s the doorbell. Upon answering he finds Scarlett (Kim Min-ji), a prostitute she claims Junho called the night before. Though he doesn’t recall, he takes her word for it and invites her in. Eventually they strike a bargain: no sex, but Scarlett will hang out with Junho for three days for a cool two million won (about $1,700). He gets the companionship he so desperately craves, she gets rich.

From there things take a turn for the increasingly absurd, as Junho and Scarlett chatter away without ever revealing too much about themselves (the noose always hanging between them), and more freak events put Junho’s suicide on the back burner. The highlight (or low point for Junho) comes when EMS workers looking for a pregnant woman barge into the house while he’s on the phone with his frantic mother (his dad is missing) — and then commandeer his rope. Scarlett, however, has ulterior motives, which play out when her “pimp” shows up demanding more cash.

The Noises is vaguely reminiscent of Lee Seung-won’s New Currents Netpac-winner Communication & Lies from 2015: a low-budget indie, shot in black-and-white and pivoting on two lonely people trying to make a connection (one more pic like it and it’s officially a trend). Essentially a two-hander unfolding in one location, The Noises, however, has a dark comic streak running through it, and is less interested in explaining the root causes of Junho’s desire to end his life. It’s enough for Min to watch Junho react to his environment and puzzle out what makes him take the noose down for good.

By its very nature, the film relies on the back and forth between the two leads, and they do have their moments, chiefly an impromptu dance that unfortunately brings their budding friendship to a screeching halt. They’re a bit creaky at the outset but soon rise above awkward community theater-type acting to settle into a comfortable rhythm. Kim Min-ji keeps pace with her co-star regardless of the fact she has less to work with: Scarlett’s motivations are even less defined than Junho’s, and Min puts her this close to “hooker with a heart of gold” territory. Technically, The Noises is acceptable, even if it’s stylistically unremarkable.

Venue: Busan International Film Festival
Cast: Kim Joon-ho, Kim Min-ji
Director-screenwriter: Min Je-hong
Producer: Ji Jae-hwan
Director of photography: Min Je-hong
Production designer: Lee Mi-so
Editor: Min Je-hong
Music: Narae

In Korean

Not rated, 77 minutes

'Mrs K': Film Review | Busan 2016

In this article we write a complete information hollywood 'Mrs K': Film Review | Busan 2016 . In this article we write a list of horer movies missons movies civil war movies based on jungle movies batman movies superman movies Warcraft  movies based on animal movies based on biography drama comedy adventure based on full action movie based on full romance movies based on adventure action and other type of movies details are provide in this article. A good collection of all fantastic movies 2016 are here

watch movies free online


Hollywood 'Mrs K': Film Review | Busan 2016 And News:

Veteran Hong Kong actor Kara Wai stars as a rich homemaker forced to come out fighting against an old nemesis from her shady past.
Given Mrs K's abundance of Tarantino-esque tropes – the spaghetti western theme, the talky stand-offs, the sporadic moments of splattering gore – it's perhaps safe to describe its Malaysian director Ho Yuhang as having delivered his Jackie Brown Kills Bill. And Ho has his Pam -Grier-meets-Uma-Thurman on his side too. Playing a rich housewife literally fist-fighting her way to confront her violent past, Hong Kong veteran actor Kara Wai makes a cracking return to the action-movie roots that propelled her to fame in the 1970s and 1980s.

Reuniting with the filmmaker who revived her career in 2009 with At the End of Daybreak – her turn as a distressed mother resulted in awards galore in Hong Kong and abroad – Wai is obviously the anchoring presence here, as she laps up every opportunity to flex her solid acting and athletic chops. Through her performance, the titular character's desperate pursuit of her antagonists is brought vividly to the fore.

While never short on atmospherics and action, Mrs K is in need of a more focused plot, a more stripped-down screenplay. By delegating a significant bulk of heroic antics to the protagonists' beloved ones, Ho has also diverted from the straightforward, hard-knuckle rollercoaster which his premise promised. Still, the film should appeal to its home audiences in Hong Kong and Southeast Asia after its bow at Busan, and also to martial arts (and Tarantino) fans.

Mrs K begins with the separate deaths of three men: a retiree (Hong Kong director Fruit Chan) dies in his swimming pool; a priest (Kirk Wong, another Hong Kong filmmaker) is slashed in a confessional booth; and a loan shark (Malaysian helmer Dain Iskandar Said) is hacked to death outside his squalid office. Their significance to the plot is not swiftly explained, as the film zips to a lavish house where a homemaker (Wai – her character is never named) prevents two hoodlums' feeble robbery with a sharp move of the wrist and an even sharper aim with a gun.

This comical exchange reveals the seemingly mild-mannered woman's killer instincts – traits at odds with her appearance as the good wife of an affluent doctor (Taiwanese rock star Wu Bai) and the caring mother of a vibrant teen (Siow Li Xuan). Her mask begins to slip with the appearance of a sleazy private eye (Tony Liu), who arrives unannounced at her home armed with a threat to reveal a past Macau-set misdeed committed by her and her associates.

That's just the overture, however, as the ex-cop's minor threat is soon replaced by a more deadly avenger from the past (Simon Yam), who, with the help of a heavy (Faisal Hussein), forces her hand by abducting the woman's daughter. With that, the die is cast and the woman's muscle memory kicks in, as she embarks on a rollicking chase to bury the past in order to save her present and future.

Mrs K runs along nicely during its first half, as Ho plays his leading character's masquerade and the mysterious villains' dark schemes to tense, enigmatic effect. After the big reveal, all bets are off - and not necessarily in a good way. Not content with delivering merely an action-portrait of a woman revealing her long-suppressed violent impulses, Ho makes some ill-advised attempts at complexity and character nuance. That's not what the audience came for.

Production Company: Red Films, Paperheart
Cast: Kara Wai, Simon Yam, Wu Bai, Siow Li Xuan, Faizal Hussein
Director: Ho Yuhang
Screenwriters: Ho Yuhang, Chan Wai-keung
Producers: Lina Tan, Albert Lee, Lorna Tee, Ho Yuhang
Executive producers: Michael Lake, Albert Yeung
Director of photography: Teoh Gay Hian
Production designer: Wong Tai Sy
Editor: Soo Mun Thye, Sharon Chong
Music: Fugu
International Sales: Emperor Motion Pictures
In Cantonese, Mandarin and Malay
96 minutes